The Doctor's Five Alphas (Steamy BBW Werewolf Pack Menage Romance)

The Doctor’s Five Alphas

By Willow Wilde

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The Doctor’s Five Alphas

 

I
knew we were in trouble the moment I saw McGregor – the Chief of Medicine – walking briskly towards us.

 

The head of our entire department, he was a stern but understanding father to all his employees. He’d been a part of this hospital for decades, and had a long-earned reputation for easing the brutal choices that came with lifesaving medical work. But McGregor didn’t have to rely on his prominent station to command respect naturally – unless you were rushing to cut someone open, when you saw him coming you instantly stopped whatever you were doing. In those last seconds you had to quickly figure out how much shit you were in.

 

The nurses and practitioners around me backed away slowly as the Chief of Medicine’s gaze narrowed down onto me.
Crap
, I thought to myself. Once the wounded target was established, the others quickly dissipated around the counter and disappearing down hallways, leaving me to my fate.

 

McGregor glanced over my shoulder quickly before looking me in the eyes. “Chairman wants to see you.”

 

“He does?” I thought this over for a second. The administrative director over the hospital, Harold Chairman was more accurately our
dean
, but his interesting surname leant to the colloquialism. It helped that he headed the Board of Directors and ran the hospital like a tightly oiled business. Still, he had never specifically summoned any of the physicians during the middle of a shift. “Did he happen to say why?”

 

“He didn’t even tell
me
,” McGregor grumbled. “But I’d highly suggest you
not
keep him waiting. What’s on your plate right now?”

 

I motioned over the counter to the working women at their computers. “I’m waiting on lab results for Stenszky, Room 421. Should only be another few minutes.”

 

McGregor frowned. “And you have nothing better to do than chit-chat with your associates in the meantime?”

 

“You’re…you’re right, I’m sorry,” I conceded. “I’ll get right to him. He’s in his office?”

 

“See that you do,” McGregor told me with a sharp eye. “And yes, he was there five minutes ago. Elevator B, then E…probably the fastest way there.”

 

“Right, thanks,” I mumbled as I ducked around him and took the quick left turn towards the elevator bay, lost deep in my thoughts.

 

What could the Chairman possibly want with me?

 

~

 

The Chairman’s office was on the top floor, reserved for most of the administration and the Board’s conference room. The staff assistants barely paid me any mind as I took the memorized turns –
left, right, left, slight right
– and headed towards the conference room as quickly as I could.

 

I’d rarely been this way. There was very little reason for someone of my stature to ever be on this floor, let alone meeting with the mysterious gentleman who intimidated every rung on the ladder above me – no matter how high they went.

 

The door to his office resided in the back of the conference room. I had always considered it an odd architectural choice, but reasoned that it was intentional. In order to meet the Chairman on his territory, you had to cross the spacious room where the decisions that shook the entire hospital to its core were made.

 

The door was open, which wasn’t a good sign. Taking a deep breath, I set my shoulders back, chin up, and stepped into his office.

 

“Close the door behind you, wouldn’t you?”

 

I smiled as warmly as I could and did as I was told. The large executive door closed with a satisfying click. Hesitant to see what this was all about, I walked courageously towards the old man in his business suit while taking in his exquisite chamber.

 

The Chairman’s chamber was a large, elegant office with wooden paneling, lined with bookcases neatly filled with medical journals and textbooks. A large, expensive Persian rug reached across the open space. Two dark leather chairs resided in front of his executive desk, behind which the Chairman himself stood.

 

“Please, have a seat,” he smiled cheerily as he waved me over. “Make yourself comfortable.”

 

“Don’t mind if I do,” I replied, returning his cheery smile with my own somewhat professional smirk. “So, how can I be of assistance, sir?”

 

The Chairman drifted his gaze, wandering around from behind his desk to hover at its side. He paused for a moment, apparently searching for the words before finally opening his mouth, silent for another second.

 

“Doctor Atwood, you’ve been part of this hospital for…how many years is it now? Four?”

 

“A couple of months makes five,” I answered, disguising my apprehension. Conversations that started this way with powerful people, much higher up the food chain…they didn’t tend to end well.

 

“Almost five years,” he murmured to himself. “And in this time, you have proven your commitment time and time again. Long, thankless hours, the usual hospital politics, and always a smile on your face. I don’t know
how
you do it.”

 

I was a little taken aback by his observations. “Well, it’s hard work, but I’m happy to do it,” I answered truthfully.

 

“Yes…quite,” he answered aloofly. Somehow, I got the odd sensation that I’d answered incorrectly.

 

While he oddly dwelled on his thoughts, I realized he wasn’t even looking at me. After half a minute of silence, I subtly snuck a look at my wristwatch.

 

“You must be wondering why I asked you here,” he instantly spoke aloud, turning back to stair out the large floor-to-ceiling window behind his desk. With his hands clasped behind his back, he gazed down onto the city streets. Meanwhile, I watched quizzically from my chair in front of his desk.

 

“Astute as always, sir.”

 

The Chairman’s gaze immediately snapped onto mine, and after a moment he chuckled. “Quite…as it so happens, Doctor, I have a favor to ask of you.”

 

The Chairman? Asking a favor of ME?
“Whatever could I possibly do for you, sir?”

 

“A dear friend of mine requires medical attention, and I need a highly capable doctor to tend to his injuries,” he spoke, turning his face to gaze vaguely in my direction. “Are you up to it?”

 


Me?
Chairman, sir, I’m flattered, but surely there are far more capable doctors than I here…”

 

“That’s partially true,” he observed, turning back around to face me again. “You see, Doctor Atwood, I’ve been studying your work for the last 24 hours. You’re young, highly brash, and make judgment calls on
highly questionable
hunches. Some of them, had they been brought to my attention earlier, might have landed you on silent probation…”

 

I gulped. The Chairman was fond of silent probation – his trademark approach of putting one of his employees on thin ice
without telling them
. It was an automatic “one strike, you’re out” policy – reserved for those he considered ultimately a liability to his tightly run hospital.

 

I know I’d had a few close calls before, but I apparently hadn’t realized how dangerously close to the edge I’d been.

 

“…However, the fact of the matter is that I wasn’t told, and I trust your ward. McGregor’s been loyal and highly competent for over thirty years. His judgment weighs heavy with me. If he thinks you haven’t been a liability yet, then I’m willing to overlook what I’ve seen…which brings me back to your competence.”

 

I listened carefully, hanging off of every word.

 

“You see, the
problem
with you is that you’ve had a particularly high track record of success under inopportune circumstances. You’ve only lost a couple of patients on a ratio that beats most of your peers – peers with decades of experience versus yours. Unlike most of them, you’re humble of your talents without belittling them – and you’re willing to do whatever it takes to get it done. Doctor Atwood –
Alaina
– you are precisely who I need to see to it that my friend pulls through.”

 

“I’m flattered that you think so, sir,” I replied honestly. “But I still…” I watched his face as it settle slightly, his brow furrowing. “…
Right
. Sir, how soon will he be here? Is he already checked in?”

 

“No, I’m afraid he won’t be coming here,” the Chairman remarked. “In fact, you’ll be going
there
. I’ll have a plane ready for you tomorrow. Finish up your shift, get your rest, and have yourself dropped off here at the proper time. My driver will take you to the airport, and my assistant will get you the details later this afternoon when the arrangements are made.”

 

“Sir…I’m fully booked this week,” I objected. “What will I do about my shifts? I’m not sure I can pull enough strings to –“

 

He smiled and shook his head, cutting me off. “I’ll have it all taken care of. You usually work twenty-five hours extra, as I’ve noticed – I’ll see to it that your salary is bumped to overtime pay for the duration of your week. So…are you up to it?”

 

“…Yes sir,” I nodded, rising to shake his hand. “Thank you for your faith. I’ll do absolutely everything I can for your friend.”

 

“See that you do. Dane’s group has been friends of my family for generations now.”

 

I took my leave, crossing over his luxurious rug and lost deep in thought. As my fingers wrapped around his doorknob, I heard the Chairman stop me one last time.

 

“And Alaina,
do
get your rest. Romania’s a long flight, after all…”

 

~

 

The cold struck me immediately as I stepped out of the Sibiu International Airport the following day, after ten miserable hours of flight. My baggage rolling behind me as I followed the man left to pick me up from the airport – a dapper older gentleman named Pensley.

 

Leading me towards a nearby car, he waved his arms at the exquisite, European architecture surrounding us. “Well, welcome to Romania!” He chuckled, popping open the door for me. “I’m afraid we won’t be staying in the cultured, civilized parts for long…your patient is an outlier in a village far from here. Buckle yourself in for a ride!”

 

I let the cheerful, portly fellow close my door and take my luggage to the trunk. As he sat comfortably behind the wheel, I could hear him give a few wheezing breaths for a moment, his fingers already digging for his keys. Plucking the ring from his pocket, he sorted out the proper one after a few
hmms
and
hahs
. Jamming it into the ignition, he looked over his shoulder and through the back window as he twisted the wheel, pulling out from behind the car ahead before peeling onto the road.

 

“So, what brings you to Bucharest? The Chair was a bit
mum
, which isn’t very typical for him…”

 

“Here on business. He’s sent me here to tend to a friend of his,” I answered. “Do you happen to know anything about that?”

 

“A friend? Ill? Can’t say that I do…but he’s having me drop you off in a peculiar part of the world,” Pensley observed. “You’re heading northeast, deep into the rural parts of the country. Although, safe to fairly say almost
all
of Romania is rural, when you get out of the cities.”

 

“Right,” I nodded, taking in his words.

 

“Odd thing, though. The Chair doesn’t come out this way often. Whoever this
friend
of his is, he either has family hailing from way out here…or perhaps he’s someone who simply doesn’t like to be found…”

 

~

 

A short while later, still in the heart of Bucharest, we were driving down a three-lane highway dominated by several massive, sprawling buildings. Pensley pointed out one in particular, a major building that, from my angle, was a long construct with a smaller, higher tier and a third block on top. It also looked like more windows than actual stone. It was an off-white color, sitting in a wide, open yard of lush grasses and trees, and prefaced by a sea of parked cars.

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